ADRIANCE VAN BRUNT(1892-1901)As part of #KCParks125, we are featuring all 104 Park Board Commissioners in order of their service.Park Board Commissioner Adriance Van Brunt (1836-1913) was born in Englewood, New Jersey and moved to Kansas City in 1878 with his wife, Anna and daughter, Effie. He had served in the New Jersey Regiment in the Civil War. Mr. Van Brunt was an architect and established the architectural firm A. Van Brunt and Company, later also called A. Van Brunt and Brother. His younger brother, John moved to Kansas City as well and was trained as an architect. Adriance was a family name.When Mr. Van Brunt was appointed to the Park Board in 1892 he became the first Park Board Secretary. The Secretary was responsible for taking minutes, or having them taken, so that an official record would be made and available; also signing official papers, as needed. Mr. Van Brunt also worked on surveys for properties proposed by the Kansas City Park Board to be developed.Mr. Van Brunt and Park Board President August Meyer took a trip to the eastern United States in 1892 to talk with renowned landscape architect Frederick Law Olmsted about a plan for parks and boulevards in Kansas City, and also to visit various established parks there. While serving on the Park Board, Mr. Van Brunt still had his own architectural business. He had the skills necessary to not offend his regular clients, many of whom wanted boulevards to go by their homes or businesses, and work on plans for Kansas City’s parks and boulevards in the best interests of Kansas City.After retiring from the Park Board in 1901, Adriance Van Brunt continued working in the architectural field for several years, designing projects mostly in Kansas City but also in other states, including several projects for the Kansas City Park Board like the maintenance building and stable at 39th and Gillham Road, the main entrance at Swope Park and others. His brother, John, worked for the city for a while and then went into private practice. John worked closely with landscape architect George Kessler and was responsible for several elements of The Paseo – the Ninth Street Fountain – now the Womens’ Lea | KC Parks Instagram Photos

ADRIANCE VAN BRUNT(1892-1901)As part of #KCParks125, we are featuring all 104 Park Board Commissioners in order of their service.Park Board Commissioner Adriance Van Brunt (1836-1913) was born in Englewood, New Jersey and moved to Kansas City in 1878 with his wife, Anna and daughter, Effie. He had served in the New Jersey Regiment in the Civil War. Mr. Van Brunt was an architect and established the architectural firm A. Van Brunt and Company, later also called A. Van Brunt and Brother. His younger brother, John moved to Kansas City as well and was trained as an architect. Adriance was a family name.When Mr. Van Brunt was appointed to the Park Board in 1892 he became the first Park Board Secretary. The Secretary was responsible for taking minutes, or having them taken, so that an official record would be made and available; also signing official papers, as needed. Mr. Van Brunt also worked on surveys for properties proposed by the Kansas City Park Board to be developed.Mr. Van Brunt and Park Board President August Meyer took a trip to the eastern United States in 1892 to talk with renowned landscape architect Frederick Law Olmsted about a plan for parks and boulevards in Kansas City, and also to visit various established parks there. While serving on the Park Board, Mr. Van Brunt still had his own architectural business. He had the skills necessary to not offend his regular clients, many of whom wanted boulevards to go by their homes or businesses, and work on plans for Kansas City’s parks and boulevards in the best interests of Kansas City.After retiring from the Park Board in 1901, Adriance Van Brunt continued working in the architectural field for several years, designing projects mostly in Kansas City but also in other states, including several projects for the Kansas City Park Board like the maintenance building and stable at 39th and Gillham Road, the main entrance at Swope Park and others. His brother, John, worked for the city for a while and then went into private practice. John worked closely with landscape architect George Kessler and was responsible for several elements of The Paseo – the Ninth Street Fountain – now the Womens’ Lea

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