{Throwback Thursday} #KCParks125 #FromTheArchives #TBT #KCParks This 1911 photograph shows the playground at Holmes Square Park, formerly located between 18th and 19th Streets, Holmes and Cherry. While featuring children at play, the woman in the picture with the big hat deserves recognition. Her name was Elenore Canny and she was a notable character in the early days of Kansas City playground development.Elenore graduated from Manual High School in 1904 and went into a new field – planned recreational activities. Areas designed specifically for children’s play began in the United States in the late 1880s based on European models. Supported by social and reform groups largely made up of women members, changes and improvements concerning child labor laws, schools and playgrounds were instituted in a number of cities. The Playground Association of America, formed in 1906 encouraged the development of distinctive places where children could run and play games, instead of playing in the streets. Their thought was to help prevent crime and accidents, to give children a safe outlet for their energy, and to help them develop confidence.Elenore taught “games, apparatus work and gymnastic dancing” in the Kansas City public schools and attended Missouri State University before being hired by the Kansas City, MO Park Department to take charge of the “first regularly organized [city run] playground in Kansas City” in 1908 at Holmes Square Park. She took her job of creating activities for children and their protection very seriously. In 1910, she was sworn in as a Kansas City police officer, while keeping her supervisory position in recreation with the KC Park Department. When asked why she wanted to become a police officer, she said, “I want to be a ‘policewoman’ so I can have the authority to make these great big gawks of men who come hanging around our play ground move on.” [“Kansas City Now Has a Woman Cop” [Kansas City Journal Aug. 4, 1910]. She was the second woman in Kansas City to be sworn in as a police officer and one of three women sworn in as police officers in the United States at this time. She died in 1983 at the age of 96. | KC Parks Instagram Photos

{Throwback Thursday} #KCParks125 #FromTheArchives #TBT #KCParks This 1911 photograph shows the playground at Holmes Square Park, formerly located between 18th and 19th Streets, Holmes and Cherry. While featuring children at play, the woman in the picture with the big hat deserves recognition. Her name was Elenore Canny and she was a notable character in the early days of Kansas City playground development.Elenore graduated from Manual High School in 1904 and went into a new field – planned recreational activities. Areas designed specifically for children’s play began in the United States in the late 1880s based on European models. Supported by social and reform groups largely made up of women members, changes and improvements concerning child labor laws, schools and playgrounds were instituted in a number of cities. The Playground Association of America, formed in 1906 encouraged the development of distinctive places where children could run and play games, instead of playing in the streets. Their thought was to help prevent crime and accidents, to give children a safe outlet for their energy, and to help them develop confidence.Elenore taught “games, apparatus work and gymnastic dancing” in the Kansas City public schools and attended Missouri State University before being hired by the Kansas City, MO Park Department to take charge of the “first regularly organized [city run] playground in Kansas City” in 1908 at Holmes Square Park. She took her job of creating activities for children and their protection very seriously. In 1910, she was sworn in as a Kansas City police officer, while keeping her supervisory position in recreation with the KC Park Department. When asked why she wanted to become a police officer, she said, “I want to be a ‘policewoman’ so I can have the authority to make these great big gawks of men who come hanging around our play ground move on.” [“Kansas City Now Has a Woman Cop” [Kansas City Journal Aug. 4, 1910]. She was the second woman in Kansas City to be sworn in as a police officer and one of three women sworn in as police officers in the United States at this time. She died in 1983 at the age of 96.

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