{Throwback Thursday} #KCParks125 #TBTSpring Valley Park circa 1907. Spring Valley Park gets its name from the six springs that used to flow within the thirty-three acres acquired for the park and because the land was located in a valley area. The park is located between Twenty-seventh Street on the north, Garfield and Brooklyn Avenues on the east, Twenty-ninth Street on the south and Woodland Avenue and Vine Street on the west.In 1900 residents of the nearby area petitioned the Park Board to create a park in this area because, along with promoting the beauty of the area, they were concerned about undesirable people and activities being in the vicinity. In 1901, George Kessler and the Park Board decided that the attractiveness of the land including the springs, knolls, glens, trees and a rock quarry would make a good property to add to the Kansas City park system. Two of the springs were developed for use of visitors by the Park Department and a 1905 Kansas City Star article said that it was estimated that hundreds of people would come to drink the spring water every day. One of the springs flowed from a cavern with a limestone ledge.A road was built through the park, completed in 1906 called Spring Valley Drive. By 1907, the quarry was graded and the section made into a playground. Some of the spring water was dammed and became a small lake. By 1939, five of the six original springs had dried up and the sixth was almost gone. What had been the lake was replaced by tennis courts.This 1907 photograph, taken for the park department by professional photographer E. J. Davison, was made into a postcard through the photographer. In 1968 Mildred [Mrs. Sam] Ray featured the postcard in her great historic postcard column published in the Kansas City Times newspaper. One of the women in the picture saw it and wrote in response. She remembered the day the photograph was taken and was surprised when the photo ended up being on a postcard. She and her friend were high school students at the time and were just walking through the park when the photographer asked them to pose for a picture. #Throwbackthursday #KCParks | KC Parks Instagram Photos

{Throwback Thursday} #KCParks125 #TBTSpring Valley Park circa 1907. Spring Valley Park gets its name from the six springs that used to flow within the thirty-three acres acquired for the park and because the land was located in a valley area. The park is located between Twenty-seventh Street on the north, Garfield and Brooklyn Avenues on the east, Twenty-ninth Street on the south and Woodland Avenue and Vine Street on the west.In 1900 residents of the nearby area petitioned the Park Board to create a park in this area because, along with promoting the beauty of the area, they were concerned about undesirable people and activities being in the vicinity. In 1901, George Kessler and the Park Board decided that the attractiveness of the land including the springs, knolls, glens, trees and a rock quarry would make a good property to add to the Kansas City park system. Two of the springs were developed for use of visitors by the Park Department and a 1905 Kansas City Star article said that it was estimated that hundreds of people would come to drink the spring water every day. One of the springs flowed from a cavern with a limestone ledge.A road was built through the park, completed in 1906 called Spring Valley Drive. By 1907, the quarry was graded and the section made into a playground. Some of the spring water was dammed and became a small lake. By 1939, five of the six original springs had dried up and the sixth was almost gone. What had been the lake was replaced by tennis courts.This 1907 photograph, taken for the park department by professional photographer E. J. Davison, was made into a postcard through the photographer. In 1968 Mildred [Mrs. Sam] Ray featured the postcard in her great historic postcard column published in the Kansas City Times newspaper. One of the women in the picture saw it and wrote in response. She remembered the day the photograph was taken and was surprised when the photo ended up being on a postcard. She and her friend were high school students at the time and were just walking through the park when the photographer asked them to pose for a picture. #Throwbackthursday #KCParks

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