{Throwback Thursday} The Parade circa 1908 #KCParks125“The Parade” Park is located between 15th Street and 17th Terrace, The Paseo and Woodland. In the late 19th century, the then privately owned property was used as a space for temporary exhibitions, including travelling circuses. The 1893 “master plan” for the development of Kansas City’s parks and boulevards includes The Parade as “…a central point in provisions for recreation and amusements” [p. 43 1893 Report of Park and Boulevard Commissioners], to be used as a place for parades, concerts, outdoor meetings, as well as for games and sports activities.Early ideas for the property included a bicycle track, grand stands from which to watch athletic activities, a pavilion, a swimming pool, tennis and handball courts, and other facilities. Part of the area was to be used as a place for the local National Guard units for drills, exercises and parades. While the grandstand, pavilion and bicycle track were never built, the Parade was and is used for various forms of recreational activities.The first public bathhouse in the city was built at The Parade in 1901. A bathhouse could be used to take a bath or a shower or go swimming in a pool. The baths were free as long as you could provide your own bathing suit and towel. To rent a suit and a towel cost five cents each.A popular winter activity at The Parade in the early 1900s was the flooding of the ball fields to create an ice skating rink.In 1938, the bathhouse was torn down and a new community center built and opened in 1940. The Parade Community Center had a locker room and showers and a stage. There was a swimming pool outside the building. In 1955 this building was torn down and a new community center built. It was named the Gregg Community Center after John Gregg, a local insurance executive and civic leader. In 1996 this building was torn down and the new “John Gregg Community Center and Arrington Klice Fitness Center” was built. Arrington Klice was a local boxing coach and mentor to hundreds of underprivileged youth in Kansas City.#KCParks #TBT #ThrowbackThursday | KC Parks Instagram Photos

{Throwback Thursday} The Parade circa 1908 #KCParks125“The Parade” Park is located between 15th Street and 17th Terrace, The Paseo and Woodland. In the late 19th century, the then privately owned property was used as a space for temporary exhibitions, including travelling circuses. The 1893 “master plan” for the development of Kansas City’s parks and boulevards includes The Parade as “…a central point in provisions for recreation and amusements” [p. 43 1893 Report of Park and Boulevard Commissioners], to be used as a place for parades, concerts, outdoor meetings, as well as for games and sports activities.Early ideas for the property included a bicycle track, grand stands from which to watch athletic activities, a pavilion, a swimming pool, tennis and handball courts, and other facilities. Part of the area was to be used as a place for the local National Guard units for drills, exercises and parades. While the grandstand, pavilion and bicycle track were never built, the Parade was and is used for various forms of recreational activities.The first public bathhouse in the city was built at The Parade in 1901. A bathhouse could be used to take a bath or a shower or go swimming in a pool. The baths were free as long as you could provide your own bathing suit and towel. To rent a suit and a towel cost five cents each.A popular winter activity at The Parade in the early 1900s was the flooding of the ball fields to create an ice skating rink.In 1938, the bathhouse was torn down and a new community center built and opened in 1940. The Parade Community Center had a locker room and showers and a stage. There was a swimming pool outside the building. In 1955 this building was torn down and a new community center built. It was named the Gregg Community Center after John Gregg, a local insurance executive and civic leader. In 1996 this building was torn down and the new “John Gregg Community Center and Arrington Klice Fitness Center” was built. Arrington Klice was a local boxing coach and mentor to hundreds of underprivileged youth in Kansas City.#KCParks #TBT #ThrowbackThursday

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