{ThrowbackThursday} Linwood Boulevard and The Paseo Intersection Traffic Signal #TBT #KCParks125This attractive and historic traffic signal that sits in the middle of the intersection of Linwood Boulevard and The Paseo was designed by noted architect Edward Buehler Delk. It was installed in March 1931. The light is still in daily use but is in need of repair. Plans are being prepared to fix it at a future time.MOREThis intersection has accommodated a great deal of traffic for many years. In 1920 it was considered the city’s most dangerous corner because of the high volume of traffic daily and the unusually wide area.In September 1922, a large round wooden fence was built in the center of the intersection creating a roundabout for traffic as an experiment. This helped to route traffic but cars still bunched up and it did not allow for pedestrians crossing the streets. Occasionally a policeman was in the center of the circle to direct traffic but this was not a practical solution.The wooden fence was torn out because of damage by cars and another round wooden fence was placed there in 1924 after the corners of the intersection were readjusted to make a wider area as talk and suggestions continued as to what to do as a permanent solution with this intersection. An automatic traffic signal was mentioned but automatic signals were fairly new and had not been used much at this time. In December 1925 a 25-foot tall Christmas tree was placed in the center of the circle using electricity from the nearby St. Regis Hotel for lights.An article from the Kansas City Star in early 1926 called use of the traffic circle “ring around a hubcap”. After pleadings of the public and nearby residents and businesses, the circle which had been given the nicknames of “hog pen” and “pig pen” because of its unsightly appearance, was finally removed in January 1927. Buttons were placed in the street in an effort to continue the roundabout routing but that was not successful.In fall of 1927, an experimental automated traffic light on a pole was placed by Kansas City Power and Light in a wooden circle, smaller than in previous years, in the center of the intersection so that the | KC Parks Instagram Photos

{ThrowbackThursday} Linwood Boulevard and The Paseo Intersection Traffic Signal #TBT #KCParks125This attractive and historic traffic signal that sits in the middle of the intersection of Linwood Boulevard and The Paseo was designed by noted architect Edward Buehler Delk. It was installed in March 1931. The light is still in daily use but is in need of repair. Plans are being prepared to fix it at a future time.MOREThis intersection has accommodated a great deal of traffic for many years. In 1920 it was considered the city’s most dangerous corner because of the high volume of traffic daily and the unusually wide area.In September 1922, a large round wooden fence was built in the center of the intersection creating a roundabout for traffic as an experiment. This helped to route traffic but cars still bunched up and it did not allow for pedestrians crossing the streets. Occasionally a policeman was in the center of the circle to direct traffic but this was not a practical solution.The wooden fence was torn out because of damage by cars and another round wooden fence was placed there in 1924 after the corners of the intersection were readjusted to make a wider area as talk and suggestions continued as to what to do as a permanent solution with this intersection. An automatic traffic signal was mentioned but automatic signals were fairly new and had not been used much at this time. In December 1925 a 25-foot tall Christmas tree was placed in the center of the circle using electricity from the nearby St. Regis Hotel for lights.An article from the Kansas City Star in early 1926 called use of the traffic circle “ring around a hubcap”. After pleadings of the public and nearby residents and businesses, the circle which had been given the nicknames of “hog pen” and “pig pen” because of its unsightly appearance, was finally removed in January 1927. Buttons were placed in the street in an effort to continue the roundabout routing but that was not successful.In fall of 1927, an experimental automated traffic light on a pole was placed by Kansas City Power and Light in a wooden circle, smaller than in previous years, in the center of the intersection so that the

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