{Throwback Thursday} The Thomas Hart Benton monument at the intersection of St. John Ave., Gladstone and Benton Boulevards on the Concourse, was dedicated to Senator Thomas Hart Benton, not to his great-nephew, the artist of the same name. At present, the two plaques associated with the monument are not on the rock upon which they were placed in 1915. One of the plaques was stolen a few years ago and the other, the one shown in the photograph, is in the office of Kansas City Parks and Recreation. Plans are to clean and reinstall the plaque held by KCPR and to replicate the stolen plaque and install it.Senator Thomas Hart Benton (1782-1858) represented the state of Missouri in the United States Senate from 1821 (the year that Missouri became a state) until 1851 and served one term in the United States House of Representatives from 1853 until 1855. In the late 1800s and early 1900s, the Senator was held in high regard for seeing the potential of westward expansion. More specific to the Kansas City area, a speech that he made in 1852 was something very well known in the Kansas City area when his monument was proposed by a local Daughters of the American Revolution chapter in 1913.The Thomas Hart Benton monument was erected through the efforts of Mrs. H. J. S. Seely and a committee of the Elizabeth Benton Chapter of the DAR. Local architect John Van Brunt designed the memorial and plaques, and the bronze plates were made by John Williams & Co. of New York. It was dedicated on Nov. 20, 1915. In 1852 while standing on a rock near the Missouri River bluffs on the north side of the Missouri River, Senator Benton’s prediction for the future of what is now Kansas City was: Here where these rocky bluffs meet and turn aside the sweeping current of this mighty river; here where the Missouri, after pursuing her southern course for nearly two thousand miles, turns eastward to meet the Mississippi, a great manufacturing and commercial community will congregate and less than a generation will see a great city. Benton Boulevard was also named after Senator Benton. #KCParks125 #TBT #FromTheArchives

{Throwback Thursday} The Thomas Hart Benton monument at the intersection of St. John Ave., Gladstone and Benton Boulevards on the Concourse, was dedicated to Senator Thomas Hart Benton, not to his great-nephew, the artist of the same name. At present, the two plaques associated with the monument are not on the rock upon which they were placed in 1915. One of the plaques was stolen a few years ago and the other, the one shown in the photograph, is in the office of Kansas City Parks and Recreation. Plans are to clean and reinstall the plaque held by KCPR and to replicate the stolen plaque and install it.Senator Thomas Hart Benton (1782-1858) represented the state of Missouri in the United States Senate from 1821 (the year that Missouri became a state) until 1851 and served one term in the United States House of Representatives from 1853 until 1855. In the late 1800s and early 1900s, the Senator was held in high regard for seeing the potential of westward expansion. More specific to the Kansas City area, a speech that he made in 1852 was something very well known in the Kansas City area when his monument was proposed by a local Daughters of the American Revolution chapter in 1913.The Thomas Hart Benton monument was erected through the efforts of Mrs. H. J. S. Seely and a committee of the Elizabeth Benton Chapter of the DAR.  Local architect John Van Brunt designed the memorial and plaques, and the bronze plates were made by John Williams & Co. of New York. It was dedicated on Nov. 20, 1915. In 1852 while standing on a rock near the Missouri River bluffs on the north side of the Missouri River, Senator Benton’s prediction for the future of what is now Kansas City was:  Here where these rocky bluffs meet and turn aside the sweeping current of this  mighty river; here where the Missouri, after pursuing her southern course for nearly  two thousand miles, turns eastward to meet the Mississippi, a great manufacturing  and commercial community will congregate and less than a generation will see a great  city. Benton Boulevard was also named after Senator Benton. #KCParks125 #TBT #FromTheArchives

{Throwback Thursday} The Thomas Hart Benton monument at the intersection of St. John Ave., Gladstone and Benton Boulevards on the Concourse, was dedicated to Senator Thomas Hart Benton, not to his great-nephew, the artist of the same name. At present, the two plaques associated with the monument are not on the rock upon which they were placed in 1915. One of the plaques was stolen a few years ago and the other, the one shown in the photograph, is in the office of Kansas City Parks and Recreation. Plans are to clean and reinstall the plaque held by KCPR and to replicate the stolen plaque and install it.Senator Thomas Hart Benton (1782-1858) represented the state of Missouri in the United States Senate from 1821 (the year that Missouri became a state) until 1851 and served one term in the United States House of Representatives from 1853 until 1855. In the late 1800s and early 1900s, the Senator was held in high regard for seeing the potential of westward expansion. More specific to the Kansas City area, a speech that he made in 1852 was something very well known in the Kansas City area when his monument was proposed by a local Daughters of the American Revolution chapter in 1913.The Thomas Hart Benton monument was erected through the efforts of Mrs. H. J. S. Seely and a committee of the Elizabeth Benton Chapter of the DAR.  Local architect John Van Brunt designed the memorial and plaques, and the bronze plates were made by John Williams & Co. of New York. It was dedicated on Nov. 20, 1915. In 1852 while standing on a rock near the Missouri River bluffs on the north side of the Missouri River, Senator Benton’s prediction for the future of what is now Kansas City was:  Here where these rocky bluffs meet and turn aside the sweeping current of this  mighty river; here where the Missouri, after pursuing her southern course for nearly  two thousand miles, turns eastward to meet the Mississippi, a great manufacturing  and commercial community will congregate and less than a generation will see a great  city. Benton Boulevard was also named after Senator Benton. #KCParks125 #TBT #FromTheArchives
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